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Basic German

German is the most important language of Europe when measured by the number of people who speak it as their first language. The German speaking family has no less than 90 million native speakers, which dwarfs French (65 million speakers) and English (64 million speakers) as native languages within the EU. Still, German is not the most popular language of the continent. Few non-native German speakers learn it as a second language. Most Europeans see English as more practical, French and Italian as more romantic and Spanish as more fashionable. But what about German then?

Posted by Us Europeans

Daniel, designer

Quitting a prestigious job is not a typical German thing to do. Still, I found somebody today who has made `fun` the most important part is career. Daniel Siegl (27) has worked on graphic design projects of some of German best-known companies, but he has decided that it`s time to move on to work that really pleases him.

Posted by Us Europeans

Beside being the financial capital of the European Union, Frankfurt is also one of the main air traffic hubs of the continent. Frankfurt International Airport ranks third in number of passengers, with only London Heathrow and Paris Charles de Gaulle having a higher passenger turnover. Thanks to the holiday season, today is one of the busiest days of the year at the airport. Thanks to the Us Europeans project, I now finally have a reason to ask people something I always wonder about when I am visiting airports.. What are they there for and where are they heading?

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To whoever thought that all of Germany looks the same: it does not. Apart from the language and the car license plates, it may be hard to imagine that Munich, Hamburg and Berlin are all in one country. Germany is the one and only country that separates Switzerland from the North Sea, and Czech Republic from The Netherlands. Seen like this, there would not even be a possibility that Germany is less diverse than it is. That`s how I got to today`s question for people in the streets in Frankfurt: which place in Germany do you like most, and which one do you like least?

Posted by Bruno

It`s the economy, ..

After visiting the French-chosen capital of the EU (Strassbourg), the two political capitals Brussels and Luxembourg and the most European capital of all, Berlin, I am now reporting for duty from the EU`s financial capital Frankfurt am Main. Or Mainhattan.. I am surrounded by tall yet unexciting buildings of the European Central Bank as well as headquarters of all German banks. Today`s question also deals with money: how much are the Germans suffering from the financial downturn that is reigning the western world these days?

Posted by Bruno

Finding company

During the days I spent in Germany so far, it did not take me much effort to find out that Germans can be quite demanding, both to themselves and to others. Wondering how much that affects their personal relations, I am asking young Hamburgers today: what should your perfect partner be like?

Posted by Bruno

Fighting uncertainty

I`m back in country number #26: Germany. After the first introduction from Munich (early May) and the couple of articles I wrote earlier this month, I trust I can start writing without starting off with another introduction of the country. I will simply continue from where I was. One thing I found out during earlier interviews in Germany is that Germans seem to feel uncomfortable with unexpected events, or at worst: scared of change. That observation made me come up with today`s question: what are you scared of and what would you do if you weren`t?

Posted by Bruno

Most countries that partly consist of islands will have most of their economic activity on the mainland, preferably in a capital which is centrally located. Denmark is a bit different from that. The Danish economy revolves around the islands Sealand and Fynn. The Danish `mainland` is called Jutland. It is the only part of Denmark that shares a land border with Germany. In history, however, Jutland used to be the poorest and least developed part of the country. Today`s article describes the differences between Denmark`s various regions.

Posted by Bruno

Most countries that partly consist of islands will have most of their economic activity on the mainland, preferably in a capital which is centrally located. Denmark is a bit different from that. The Danish economy revolves around the islands Sealand and Fynn. The Danish `mainland` is called Jutland. It is the only part of Denmark that shares a land border with Germany. In history, however, Jutland used to be the poorest and least developed part of the country. Today`s article describes the differences between Denmark`s various regions.

Posted by Bruno

Spending money

People from Jutland are seen by their compatriots as rather greedy. On average, they have less money to spend and they are also more careful about how they spend it, and what they spend it on. Today`s question therefore deals with money management. What do young Jutlanders like to spend money on, and which expenses do they see as nothing but nuisance?

Posted by Bruno