Us Europeans

Archives for European Union Member States

Today exactly four years ago, I embarked on a mission to spend one year travelling all 27 member states of the EU while investigating cultural diversity and interviewing over 2 700 young Europeans. Today three years ago, I completed the very same mission, compiling a massive list of 366 articles, most of which were aggregated… » read more

Posted by Bruno

Doing nothing

Separating work and private life seems to be a recurrent subject in my conversations with young Germans. It seems like many of them suffer under the imposed expectations of always having a higher income in the year to come, regardless of how much of their own personality they need to give up to stay tuned with their ambitions. Hence today`s question for some young people from Göttingen: What`s your preferred way relax?

Posted by Bruno

Cheap travelling

The size and age of an average car is one of the biggest differences between Denmark and Germany. Cars in Denmark are very expensive: the newer, the more expensive and the heavier, the more expensive. As a result, many Danes drive around in small, rusty and functional cars. The average German car is fast, smooth, oil-consuming, spotless, scratchless and heavy ? with the exception of exceptions. Fortunately for the environment, many young Germans practice car pooling. And it wouldn`t be Germany if that happened in an unstructured way.

Posted by Bruno

Travel advice.DE

To whoever thought that all of Germany looks the same: it does not. Apart from the language and the car license plates, it may be hard to imagine that Munich, Hamburg and Berlin are all in one country. Germany is the one and only country that separates Switzerland from the North Sea, and Czech Republic from The Netherlands. Seen like this, there would not even be a possibility that Germany is less diverse than it is. That`s how I got to today`s question for people in the streets in Frankfurt: which place in Germany do you like most, and which one do you like least?

Posted by Bruno

Finding company

During the days I spent in Germany so far, it did not take me much effort to find out that Germans can be quite demanding, both to themselves and to others. Wondering how much that affects their personal relations, I am asking young Hamburgers today: what should your perfect partner be like?

Posted by Bruno

Fighting uncertainty

I`m back in country number #26: Germany. After the first introduction from Munich (early May) and the couple of articles I wrote earlier this month, I trust I can start writing without starting off with another introduction of the country. I will simply continue from where I was. One thing I found out during earlier interviews in Germany is that Germans seem to feel uncomfortable with unexpected events, or at worst: scared of change. That observation made me come up with today`s question: what are you scared of and what would you do if you weren`t?

Posted by Bruno

Most countries that partly consist of islands will have most of their economic activity on the mainland, preferably in a capital which is centrally located. Denmark is a bit different from that. The Danish economy revolves around the islands Sealand and Fynn. The Danish `mainland` is called Jutland. It is the only part of Denmark that shares a land border with Germany. In history, however, Jutland used to be the poorest and least developed part of the country. Today`s article describes the differences between Denmark`s various regions.

Posted by Bruno

Most countries that partly consist of islands will have most of their economic activity on the mainland, preferably in a capital which is centrally located. Denmark is a bit different from that. The Danish economy revolves around the islands Sealand and Fynn. The Danish `mainland` is called Jutland. It is the only part of Denmark that shares a land border with Germany. In history, however, Jutland used to be the poorest and least developed part of the country. Today`s article describes the differences between Denmark`s various regions.

Posted by Bruno

Spending money

People from Jutland are seen by their compatriots as rather greedy. On average, they have less money to spend and they are also more careful about how they spend it, and what they spend it on. Today`s question therefore deals with money management. What do young Jutlanders like to spend money on, and which expenses do they see as nothing but nuisance?

Posted by Bruno

What`s cooking?

Denmark is a good place for food lovers, as long as they bring enough money. Supermarkets and restaurants in Denmark are more expensive than pretty much anywhere else, but they do have a wide variety of food on offer. It`s five o`clock in the afternoon when I start exposing people in Arhus to today`s question: what`s for dinner tonight?

Posted by Bruno