Us Europeans

Archives for European Union Member States

L`enfance perdue?

Out of all subjects I covered during the last ten months, the articles that in some way or another related to the EU were invariably the most boring. People are generally dissatisfied with politics, and whatever happens in Brussels is even futher away from their daily lives. One subject that always gets people to talk is childhood memories. Here`s the Slovakian edition:

Posted by Bruno

What`s new?

Finding some locals to help me read a local newspaper is not always easy. Whenever successful, such discussions are often a source of valuable information about the state of the country. Armed with the Slovak Daily `Dennik SME`, I try to find out what is going on in Slovakia these days with the help of Barbara (22), Marian (28) and Anastasia (25).

Posted by Bruno

Like all European countries, Slovakia saw a rapid increase in number of television channels since the early 1990s. Satellite dishes were prohibited under communism and their introduction in the market led to a real rush once they did become available. In the following years, the deployment of cable networks made satellite dishes redundant. The same is now happening to TV itself: internet is taking over.

Posted by Bruno

SK = CS – CZ

Before disintegrating into Czech Republic and Slovakia, the combined state of Czechoslovakia existed for almost one century. Born in 1918 at the end of World War I, it finally surrendered to separatist pressures in 1993, shortly after the fall of communism. Most young Czechs and Slovaks are at peace with the current situation of living in two separate states who maintain friendly relations between each other.

Posted by Bruno

Before disintegrating into Czech Republic and Slovakia, the combined state of Czechoslovakia existed for almost one century. Born in 1918 at the end of World War I, it finally surrendered to separatist pressures in 1993, shortly after the fall of communism. Most young Czechs and Slovaks are at peace with the current situation of living in two separate states who maintain friendly relations between each other.

Posted by Bruno

Ostrava fusion

Once proudly known as `The Steel Heart of the Republic`, the city of Ostrava is now back to what it used to be before communism came to Czechoslovakia: a collection of provincial towns located at the confluence of the Oder, Ostravice and Opava rivers. Chimneys are no longer seen as a sign of progress but as a source of pollution. Ostrava is now looking for new ways to repair its image and regain some of its old pride.

Posted by Bruno

Study and work ethics

In most countries across Europe, it would be advisable for secondary school pupils to think about continuing their educational career for another four years or so. In Finland and Sweden, it would be hard to find a job without a third-level education diploma. Young Slovenians will utterly disappoint their parents if they choose not to go to university. The situation in the Czech Republic is a bit different. Here`s an overview of the Czech school system, which partly explains why so many start working right after finishing secondary school.

Posted by Bruno